2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006
Brandon Loomis, Rick Egan & David Noyce Winner: Brandon Loomis, Rick Egan & David Noyce “Our Dying Forests” The Salt Lake Tribune James Astill Winner: James Astill “Seeing the Wood” The Economist Alanna Mitchell Winner: Alanna Mitchell “Sea Sick: The Global Ocean in Crisis” McClelland & Stewart (Canada) and The University of Chicago Press (U.S.A.) Blake Morrison and Brad Heath Winner: Blake Morrison & Brad Heath “The Smokestack Effect: Toxic Air and America’s Schools” USA Today David Barboza, Keith Bradsher, Howard French, Joseph Kahn, Mark Landler, Chang W. Lee, Jimmy Wang, and Jim Yardley Winner: David Barboza, Keith Bradsher, Howard French, Joseph Kahn, Mark Landler, Chang W. Lee, Jimmy Wang, and Jim Yardley “Choking on Growth” The New York Times Kenneth R. Weiss and Usha Lee McFarling Winner: Kenneth R. Weiss and Usha Lee McFarling “Altered Oceans” The Los Angeles Times Jan Barry, Thomas E. Franklin, Mary Jo Layton, Tim Nostrand, Alex Nussbaum, Tom Troncone, Debra Lynn Vial, Lindy Washburn, Barbara Williams Winner: Jan Barry, Thomas E. Franklin, Mary Jo Layton, Tim Nostrand, Alex Nussbaum, Tom Troncone, Debra Lynn Vial, Lindy Washburn, Barbara Williams “Toxic Legacy” The Record (Bergen County, NJ)
Paul Greenberg Awards of Special Merit: Paul Greenberg “Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food” Penguin Press Jeff Goodell Awards of Special Merit: Jeff Goodell “How to Cool the Planet: Geoengineering and the Audacious Quest to Fix Earth’s Climate” Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Dan Egan Awards of Special Merit: Dan Egan Environmental Beat Reporting Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Tad Fettig, Karena Albers, & Veronique Bernard Awards of Special Merit: Tad Fettig, Karena Albers, & Veronique Bernard “e2: transport” kontentreal Dinah Voyles Pulver Awards of Special Merit: Dinah Voyles Pulver “Our Natural Treasures – Are We Losing Our Way?” Daytona Beach News Journal Eugene Linden Awards of Special Merit: Eugene Linden “The Winds of Change: Climate, Weather, and the Destruction of Civilizations” Simon & Schuster Douglas Fischer Awards of Special Merit: Douglas Fischer “A Body’s Burden: Our Chemical Legacy” Oakland Tribune
UNC News 21 Team Awards of Special Merit: Caitlyn Greene, Catherine Orr, Catherine Spangler, Delphine Andrews, Hadley Gustafson, Hely Olivares, Jeffrey Mittelstadt, Kristen Long, Mimi Schiffman, Sarah Riazati, Whitney Baker, and Laura Ruel Coal: A Love Story News21 Fellows, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, School of Journalism and Mass Communication Associated Press Awards of Special Merit: Richard T. Pienciak, Ron Harris, Justin Pritchard, Jeff Donn, Mitch Weiss, Michael Kunzelman, Seth Borenstein, Rich Matthews, Jason Bronis, Tamara Lush, Mike Baker, Holbrook Mohr, Dave Clark, Fielding Cage, Merrill Sherman, Peter Prengaman, and Cain Burdeau Oil Spill Reporting Associated Press Cleo Paskal Awards of Special Merit: Cleo Paskal “Global Warring: How Environmental, Economic, and Political Crises Will Redraw the World Map” Key Porter Books (Canada) and Palgrave Macmillan (U.S.A.) Andrew Nikiforuk Awards of Special Merit: Andrew Nikiforuk “Tar Sands: Dirty Oil and the Future of a Continent” Greystone Books Alison Richards and David Malakoff Awards of Special Merit: Alison Richards and David Malakoff “Climate Connections: How people change climate, how climate changes people” National Public Radio East Oregonian Publishing Company Awards of Special Merit: Patrick Webb, The Daily Astorian; Phil Wright, Hal McCune and Samantha Bates, The East Oregonian; Kate Ramsayer, Cassandra Profita and Kara Hansen, The Daily Astorian; Elaine Shein, Tam Moore, Cookson Beecher, Bob Krauter, Mitch Lies, Patricia McCoy and Scott Yates, The Capital Press; Elizabeth Long and Cate Gable, The Chinook Observer, Scott Mallory, The Blue Mountain Eagle; Dave Hassler and Andrew Wilkins, The Wallowa Chieftain “Our Climate is Changing… Ready or Not” East Oregonian Publishing Company Elizabeth Kolbert Awards of Special Merit: Elizabeth Kolbert “The Climate of Man” The New Yorker
Gary Marcuse, Betsy Carson, & Shi Lihong Awards of Special Merit: Gary Marcuse, Betsy Carson, & Shi Lihong Waking the Green Tiger: A Green Movement Rises in China Face to Face Media Hedrick Smith, Rick Young, Marc Shaffer, Peter Pearce,
    Penny Trams, Catherine Rentz, Fritz Kramer Awards of Special Merit: Hedrick Smith, Rick Young, Marc Shaffer, Peter Pearce, Penny Trams, Catherine Rentz, Fritz Kramer “Poisoned Waters” Hedrick Smith Productions for PBS Frontline Susanne Rust & Meg Kissinger Awards of Special Merit: Susanne Rust & Meg Kissinger “Chemical Fallout” The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Ed Struzik Awards of Special Merit: Ed Struzik “The Big Thaw – Arctic in Peril” The Edmonton Journal and the Toronto Star Dimming the Sun Awards of Special Merit: A DOX production for NOVA/WGBH and the BBC “Dimming the Sun: What Does This Climate Conundrum Mean for the Future of Earth?” NOVA/WGBH and the BBC WBAL Channel 11 Awards of Special Merit: John Sherman and Beau Kershaw “Dirty Secret” WBAL-TV, Baltimore, MD

2008 Grantham Prize Winner

https://youtube.com/watch?v=rRouKD-AkKc%26hl%3Den%26fs%3D1%26rel%3D0

David Barboza, Keith Bradsher, Howard French, Joseph Kahn, Mark Landler, Chang W. Lee, Jimmy Wang, and Jim Yardley

“Choking on Growth”
The New York Times

Grantham Prize Jury Comments on Choking on Growth

The burgeoning economic expansion of China has been widely heralded as a boon for its people and its government. In this sweeping 10-part series, The New York Times fully exposes and explores the dark side of that unprecedented development: ravaging degradation of the environment.

The Times’ series describes pollution so severe that it is causing the premature deaths of nearly a million Chinese citizens yearly. Beyond that, the series reports that China is destroying its own landscape and waterways, killing off species and fouling the air and water of much of the rest of the planet. And after years of denial, the ruling regime is finally beginning to recognize that the environmental degradation is putting the stability of the Chinese government at risk.

Choking on Growth

Visit the Choking on Growth website

The Times’ series is environmental journalism of the highest order, shaped for the 21st Century. The stories, photographs, and graphics on the printed page are outstanding. Even more impressive is the online presentation, which includes compelling videos, reader-interactive forums, question-and-answer sessions with scientific and political experts and – perhaps most importantly — versions of the original stories translated into Mandarin, for the consumption of readers within China.

“Choking on Growth” is a worthy recipient of the 2008 Grantham Prize for Excellence in Reporting on the Environment.

 

About the Choking on Growth Team:

Joseph Kahn

Deputy Foreign Editor

Joseph Kahn became deputy foreign editor for The New York Times in March 2008. Mr. Kahn had been the Beijing bureau chief since July 2003. Previously, he was assigned to Shanghai. He was also a reporter in the Washington bureau, covering international economics and trade and on the business desk in New York, writing about Wall Street.

Before joining The Times in January1998, Mr. Kahn spent four years as a China correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He also worked as a city desk reporter and foreign correspondent for The Dallas Morning News.

In 1994 while at The Dallas Morning News, Mr. Kahn was part of a team of reporters awarded the Pulitzer Prize for international reporting, for their stories on violence against women around the world. In 2004, Mr. Kahn won the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for international reporting for his series of stories on labor conditions in China’s export factories. The same series received a citation from the Overseas Press Club. In 2004, Mr. Kahn and his Beijing-based colleague, Jim Yardley, won the Harry Chapin Media Award in the newspaper category for a series of stories on the rising wealth gap and outbreaks of mass protests in China. In 2006, Mr. Kahn and Mr. Yardley won a Pulitzer Prize for international reporting for their ambitious stories on ragged justice in China as the booming nation’s legal system evolves. Additionally, in 2006 Mr. Kahn and Mr. Yardley won the honorable mention in Excellence in Reporting on the Environment from Society of Publishers in Asia (SOPA).

Jim Yardley

Foreign Correspondent

Jim Yardley has been a correspondent in the Beijing bureau of The New York Times since August 2003. He has traveled throughout China and written on a wide range of topics, including social unrest, rising inequality and the country’s widespread population problems. His foreign assignment is his third reporting job at The Times.

Mr. Yardley joined the paper in 1997 as a metropolitan reporter in New York and moved to the national desk in August 1999 as bureau chief in Houston. He covered presidential politics, the collapse of Enron, the death penalty, water policy and even a town where the mayor is a beer-drinking goat. In the months after Sept. 11 terror attacks, he wrote many investigative pieces about the hijackers.

Before joining The Times, Mr. Yardley worked as a national desk reporter for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution from 1990 until 1997. Based in Atlanta, Birmingham and New Orleans, he covered stories in the Deep South as well as regional and national politics.

Mr. Yardley has also written articles for The New York Times Magazine, Oxford American, Essence and Redbook.

In 2006, Mr. Yardley and his colleague Joseph Kahn won a Pulitzer Prize for international reporting for their ambitious stories on ragged justice in China as the booming nation’s legal system evolves. Additionally, in 2006 Mr. Kahn and Mr. Yardley won the honorable mention in Excellence in Reporting on the Environment from Society of Publishers in Asia (SOPA).

David Barboza

Foreign Correspondent

David Barboza has been a correspondent for The New York Times based in Shanghai, China since November 2004. He writes primarily for the business section but also writes often for the culture section about art, film, television and dance in China. David graduated from Boston University with a bachelor’s degree in history and attended Yale University Graduate School. He was a freelance writer and a research assistant for The New York Times before being hired in 1997 as a staff writer. For five years, he was the Midwest business correspondent based in Chicago. He also covered the Enron scandal for The Times and was part of a team that was named a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize Award for Deadline Writing about Lenovo’s acquisition of I.B.M.’s personal computer business.

Howard W. French

Shanghai Bureau Chief

Howard W. French, a senior writer at The New York Times, became its Shanghai bureau chief in August 2003. Previously, Mr. French had been the Tokyo bureau chief since August 1999, after having served as the newspaper’s bureau chief in Abidjan beginning in July 1994. He served in numerous other roles at The Times, including Caribbean correspondent from April 1990 until July 1994, and a metropolitan reporter from September 1987 until April 1990. He joined The Times as a reporter-trainee in September 1986.

Mr. French was a visiting scholar in Japanese and Korean Studies at the University of Hawaii in 1998-1999, and was a recipient of a Jefferson Fellowship from Hawaii’s East-West Center.

Before joining The Times, Mr. French was a freelance journalist in Africa from 1983 to 1986, visiting 33 countries in the course of his work. His articles from the Ivory Coast appeared in The Economist, The Washington Post, The International Herald Tribune, Africa News, The Chronicle of Higher Education and African Business. From 1980 until 1983, he was an assistant professor of English at the University of Ivory Coast.

Mr. French was the 1997 recipient of the Overseas Press Club Award for his reports from Africa. In 2006, he was part of a team that won the Society of Publishers in Asia (SOPA) Award for Excellence in Explanatory Reporting.

Keith V. Bradsher

Hong Kong Bureau Chief

Keith V. Bradsher is The New York Times bureau chief in Hong Kong, where he has covered East Asian Business, economic and political news since April 2002. Before that, he had been Detroit bureau chief, covering automakers since January 1996.

Mr. Bradsher began his career at The Times as a reporter trainee in New York in June 1989, mainly covering the airline industry. After being promoted to reporter in April 1990, he covered telecommunications until April 1991, when the paper named him a national correspondent and moved him to Washington. He wrote about international economics until December 1993 and then covered domestic economic policy and financial regulation there through December 1995.

Before joining The Times, Mr. Bradsher wrote for The Los Angeles Times from 1987 until 1989 as a general assignment business reporter-intern.

Mr. Brasher is a 1997 winner of the George Polk Award for national reporting for his investigation into the human and financial toll sport utility vehicles and light trucks take on the nation’s roadways. In 2006, he was part of a team that won the Society of Publishers in Asia (SOPA) Award for Excellence in Explanatory Reporting.

He is the author of “High and Mighty: SUV’s – The World’s Most Dangerous Vehicles and How They Got That Way,” (Public Affairs, 2002).

Jimmy Wang

Video Journalist

Jimmy Wang is a video journalist for The New York Times, where he reported, produced, shot, and edited all the video stories for “Choking on Growth.” Mr. Wang has been responsible for video coverage of many stories in The New York Times, including an historic diplomatic visit by members of the press and the New York Philharmonic to Pyongyang, North Korea.

Mr. Wang’s contributions to the “Choking on Growth” series were recognized by the Whitman Bassow Award for Best Reporting in an Medium from the Overseas Pres Club of America and the Award for Online Excellence from The Society of American Business Editors. Mr. Wang and the entire “Choking on Growth” team were also finalists for the National Journalism Award for Environmental Reporting from the Scripps Howard Foundation, and Mr. Wang received a special citation for coverage of the diplomatic visit to Pyongyang.

Chang W. Lee

Senior Photographer

Chang W. Lee is a photojournalist for The New York Times, where he captured the stunning images used throughout “Choking on Growth.” Mr. Lee has covered natural catastrophes such as the 2005 tsunami, Indonesia earthquake, as well as the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and the September 11, 2001, attack on the World Trade Center. He has also covered sporting events including the Olympics in Sydney and Nagano. Mr. Lee has been honored with two Pulitzer Prizes in 2002 as part of The New York Times’ staff team for a Feature Story (Afghanistan) and a Breaking Story (September 11, 2001).