2018 Annual Science Immersion Workshop Fellows

2018 Annual Workshop | 2018 Workshop Fellows | Past Workshop Programs | Alumni

 width= Tony Briscoe is a general assignment reporter for The Chicago Tribune who has written extensively about the Great Lakes, climate science and weather-related breaking news. Since joining the Tribune in 2014, Briscoe has delved into a broad range of issues, including the viability of storing industrial carbon emissions underground and how the introduction of invasive mussels species dramatically improved Lake Michigan’s water clarity. Briscoe has been honored with two Peter Lisagor Awards, including one for his contributions to coverage on of the Chicago Cubs’ 2016 World Series championship. A graduate of Michigan State University, Briscoe began his career as a breaking news reporter at his hometown newspaper The Detroit News
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David Martin Davies is the host of The Source, a daily call-in news talk show, and Texas Matters, a weekly news magazine on Texas Public Radio. Davies is also a special projects reporter for TPR focusing on the environment and poverty.  He has reported on a wide range of issues including fracking, Hurricane Harvey, drought, and wind energy. Davies believes reporting on the environment has never been more urgent and critical. With a background in print and television as well as audio storytelling, Davies seeks to use multi-platform digital journalism to engage news consumers and help them understand what’s at stake with changing public policy on the environment and climate change. He’s the recipient of numerous journalism awards including 2008 Texas Radio Journalists of the Year by the Houston Press Club.
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Alok Gupta covers environmental issues for China Global Television Network (CGTN). He has won several awards including the International Ford Foundation Fellowship for Social Change in 2010 and the Indian Institute of Mass Communication Alumni Association Award for best agricultural reporting in 2017. A University of Kansas graduate, his detailed coverage of poor rural students cracking India’s toughest engineering exam – the Indian Institute of Technology-Joint Entrance Examination – forced one of India’s state governments to create a scholarship for the students. In 2010, his report on villagers forced to cross the India-Nepal border to get access to clean water prompted the local government to provide the village with potable water. He loves to trek volcanic trails around the world.
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Emily Holden covers climate change, energy and the U.S.Environmental Protection Agency for Politico. She relies on policy fluency and deep sourcing to explain for readers how political fights keep humanity from addressing daunting challenges. She was first to report that EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt was planning a debate of climate science and has closely tracked his ethics and transparency controversies, showing that the agency has steeply cut back on responses to public records requests. She formerly covered the Clean Power Plan for E&E News, where she led the launch of a platform for news and analysis on state energy and climate policy. Before that, she wrote an energy newsletter for a startup and covered regulations and Congress for CQ Roll Call. She was an Arizona Republic Pulliam Fellow, worked at The Advocate in her hometown of Baton Rouge and has written for the Houston Chronicle and Gannett Washington bureaus. She participated in the Fulbright Berlin Capital Program. She earned her Bachelor’s degree with a concentration in political communication from Louisiana State University, where she visited China with the Honors College. She also studied at Georgetown University through The Fund for American Studies.
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Sebastien Malo Sebastien Malo is a New York City-based correspondent who writes on climate change and humanitarian issues, among other topics, for Reuters/Thomson Reuters Foundation in New York, NY. He previously covered general news, also in New York City, for Reuters News. He has also worked for the United Nations Environment Programme and for Lebanon’s Daily Star, where he started his career as a journalist. A graduate of Columbia School of Journalism, with honors, he also holds a Master’s degree in international affairs from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, and a Bachelor’s degree in political science from Université de Montréal.
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Trevor Ombija 195x300 updated Trevor Ombija is a prime time news anchor and bi-lingual reporter with NTV in Kenya, one of East Africa’s leading broadcasters, where he delivers news that impacts Kenya and the rest of Africa. He covers environment stories, riots, politics, state functions, human interest stories and features. Ombija conducts on-air interviews with government officials, persons of interest to the public and climate change experts. He began his career as an assignment desk editor in the Africa bureau of China Global Television Network in the Nairobi before joining the Nation Media Group as a radio news presenter. Ombija has a particular interest in the environment and will be hosting a new television show that will focus on energy conservation, climate change and mitigation. He holds a Bachelor of Journalism and Media Studies degree from the University of Nairobi.
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Katie Peikes is a science reporter at Delaware Public Media, Delaware’s National Public Radio affiliate. She covers a wide range of environmental topics, including how coastal storms and sea level rise affect beaches and nearby communities, microplastics inundating the Delaware Bay, wastewater and drinking water issues, horseshoe crabs spawning on a restored beach, marine mammal strandings, the state’s fisheries and Sussex County’s poultry industry. She began her career as a reporter at The Herald Journal in Logan, Utah, where she covered everything from local government and education to air quality issues. Peikes grew up in West Hartford, Connecticut, and earned a B.A. in media and communication and in history from Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pennsylvania.
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Melissa Ross is the host and producer of WJCT’s First Coast Connect in Jacksonville, Florida, at the National Public Radio/Public Broadcasting Service station’s flagship local call-in public affairs radio program. The show focuses on politics, business, the environment, entertainment and culture, and everything in between. In 2018, Ross also began co-hosting the statewide program The Florida Roundup, heard on public radio stations around Florida. The show is a collaboration between WJCT in Jacksonville and WLRN in Miami and features newsmakers and journalists discussing issues of importance to listeners across the Sunshine State. First Coast Connect has won five national awards from Public Radio News Directors Inc. Ross received the 2015 Green Media award from the U.S. Green Building Council of Florida for her consistent coverage of climate change, sea level rise, and sustainability issues in Florida. Prior to her public radio career, she worked as a television news anchor in multiple markets, where she received four regional Emmy Awards for news and feature reporting. Ross is a graduate of Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism/Communications.
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Mark Scialla is a national affairs reporter and producer for PBS NewsHour in Washington, D.C. Scialla focuses on the environment, education and politics. His recent reporting has brought him inside a far-right militia’s training camp, to pipeline resistance blockades and to the U.S.-Mexico border. He got his start at Al Jazeera English where he worked as a researcher on investigative documentaries, including the Emmy Award-nominated film “Made In Bangladesh,” which exposed child labor in the supply chains of U.S. retailers. Scialla has reported from Myanmar, Vietnam, the Philippines and Nepal where he covered climate change, wildlife crime and natural disasters. His features and films have been published with The Guardian, Smithsonian Magazine, Al Jazeera English, Vice News and others. He holds degrees in journalism and natural resource economics from the University of Rhode Island. Before becoming a journalist, Scialla designed and planted urban gardens in Providence, Rhode Island, including the Roger Williams Park Edible Forest Garden.
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Rosanna Xia covers the environment as a staff writer for the Los Angeles Times, with a focus on California’s coastline. She previously reported on natural disasters and wrote articles that connected science, infrastructure and policy for the LA Times. With a team of reporters, she published a series in 2013 that prompted lawmakers and the public to confront thousands of buildings at risk of collapse in a major earthquake. She has also covered higher education and reported for the business section for the Times. She is part of a team that was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize for reporting on a shooting rampage in Isla Vista, California, and she is a recipient of the LA Times Editor’s Prize of the year for the earthquake safety series in 2013. An East Coast transplant, Xia graduated from Tufts University.

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